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Forgotten Camp: Allied POWs of Shenyang

One of World War II's least known prisoner of war camps is being brought back to life.

Japanese forces incarcerated some 2,000 Allied troops at the notorious Mukden POW Camp in the northeastern Chinese city of Shenyang.

Allied POWs during the "Death March". Photo provided to China Daily

Among the high-profile inmates were General Jonathan Wainwright, the commander of Allied forces in the Philippines, Major General Edward King, who led the Battle of Bataan against the Japanese invasion of the Philippines, and Major General George Moore, who commanded the Harbor Defenses of Manila and Subic Bays and the Philippine Coast Artillery during the Battle of Bataan.


An historic site and museum today, it is the best preserved of the more than 200 prisoner-of-war camps established by Japanese forces in the Asian-Pacific Theater during the war.


Assembled from the site's permanent collection of historic photographs, diaries, memoirs and more, a travelling exhibit - Forgotten Camp: Allied POWs of Shenyang - offers a glimpse into the POWs'darkest days and their tenacious, heroic struggle against Japanese oppression.


The exhibition also serves as a reminder of the history that China and the West share, of a time that they stood side-by-side to win the war.


The exhibit will run for two weeks at the WWII Pacific War Memorial Hall in San Francisco.


Forgotten Camp: Allied POWs of Shenyang opening:

When: 10:30am, Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Where: WWII Pacific War Memorial Hall, 809 Sacramento St,

San Francisco, CA 94108

Exhibition runs for two weeks till December 5, 2017.

Presented by:

Site Museum of Shenyang POW Camp of WWII Allied Forces, China

Sponsored by:

Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco

China Daily

Bureau of Culture, Broadcasting, Television, Press and Publication, Shenyang Municipal Government

WWII Pacific War Memorial Hall

Organized by: China Daily USA

Date: Nov 13, 2017

Contact: June Chang

Email: junechang@chinadailyusa.com

Mobile: 650-787-7982



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